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Primary Reason for Downloading Music From Illegal Sources

The chart illustrates the distribution of the respondents' primary reasons for downloading music from illegal sources. The most common answer by far was the price.
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Primary Reason for Streaming Music From Illegal Sources

The chart illustrates the distribution of the respondents' primary reasons for streaming music from illegal sources. The most common answer by far was the price.
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Reconfigured versus Fabricated Misinformation

The chart shows the proportion of reconfigured (N=133) and fabricated (N=86) misinformation in the sample (N=225) and the types of misinformation that constitute both reconfigured and fabricated misinformation. Out of the share of the content showed above, 59% is reconfigured (out of misleading, false context and manipulated content) and 38% is fabricated (out of fabricated and imposter content).
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Recorded Music, Wholesale Value (2012-2018)

The chart presents the evolution of the music industry revenue, based on the report of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), an industry group of major record labels. The results show that revenues measured at wholesale value grew 12% compared to 2017, reaching to $6.6 billion in 2018. The report considers that the main drivers for the growth of record labels’ revenue are streaming music platforms.
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Respondents’ Perceptions of Channels With False or Misleading Information About Coronavirus

The chart presents the distribution of different channels (social media, video sites etc.) where respondents have seen "a lot" or "a great deal" of false or misleading information about coronavirus. The participants in six countries have answered to the following question "Q4: How much false or misleading information about coronavirus (COVID-19), if any, do you think you have sen on each of the following in the last week?" Social media, messaging apps and video sites have been found the main sources of false or misleading information.
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Respondents’ Perceptions of Sources With False or Misleading Information About Coronavirus

The chart presents the distribution of different sources (politicians, governments etc.) from which respondents have seen "a lot" or "a great deal" of false or misleading information about coronavirus. The participants in six countries have answered to the following question "Q4: How much false or misleading information about coronavirus (COVID-19), if any, do you think you have sen on each of the following in the last week?"
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Retweets of ISIS Accounts

The chart compares the number of tweets, retweets, and mentions achieved by ISIS accounts compared to a randomly sampled set of users, based on data collected from Twitter. The random sample of users received significantly more retweets and mentions per account. The random sample also received more retweets and mentions per tweet, but the difference there was much smaller.
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Satisfaction with How the Internet Hosting Services Handled a Notification

This pie chart shows that the majority of respondents who encountered illegal content online and informed the internet service hosting the content were satisfied with how the internet hosting service handled their notification. European Union refers to EU28. The United Kingdom left the European Union on 31 January 2020.
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Second Notices Sent Since 2010

This column chart shows the cumulative number of second notices sent by Haute Autorité Française pour la Diffusion des Oeuvres et la Protection des droits sur Internet (HADOPI) from 2010 to 2017. HADOPI sent the most notices between July 2011 and June 2012 and between July 2013 and June 2014. The second notice refers to a graduated two-step response implemented by HADOPI to remind internet subscribers of their responsibility regarding their Internet connection which should not be used to make works protected by copyright (or related rights) available for piracy.
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Seizures of Counterfeit And Pirated Goods: Top Economies of Origin of Right Holders Whose Intellectual Property Rights Were Infringed

This chart looks at economies in which the right holders whose intellectual property rights are infringed are located (2014-2016). Location refers to the place where the headquarters of a right holder is registered. Almost 24% of the total value of seized products refers to intellectual property rights of holders registered in the United States, followed by France (16.6%), Italy (15.1%), Switzerland (11.2%) and Germany (9.3%). The data are presented with approximation. For more details please visit the source.